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The post below is shared with permission from Lenny9987.tumblr.com.  They are her thoughts on the Fraser Prophesy in response to an anon message she received.

 

Hello Anon.

There’s not a lot about the Fraser Prophecy that is clear but what there is I’ll throw under the cut since it’s first mention isn’t until Voyager. For anyone interested, the previous post mentioned is the Frank Discussion (during the conversation in the notes; so many great thoughts shared by everyone).

The first reference is made following the reappearance of Geillis near the end of Voyager when there’s a lot going on with a slow, building reveal. It begins with Geillis “catching up” with Claire and showing a decided interest in anything to do with Brianna. She even finds Jamie’s photos of Bree at one point and later Jamie realizes that one is missing – all the inquiries give Claire a decidedly uneasy feeling.

But it’s actually during an encounter with the Reverend Campbell – whose side plot I’d almost completely forgotten – that the real significance of Geillis’ interest becomes clear.

“Yes, it is interesting that it should be the Frasers, isn’t it?”

“That… what should be the Frasers?” I said. Despite myself, I moved slowly toward the desk.

“The subject of the prophecy, of course[…] Do ye not know of it? But perhaps, your husband being an illegitimate descendant…”

“I don’t know of it, no.” […]

“This is the original language of the prophecy,” he said, shoving Exhibit A under my nose. “By the Brahan Seer[…] The language is poetic, as I pointed out to Mistress Abernathy [Geillis], but the meaning is clear enough.” He was gathering enthusiasm as he went along, notwithstanding his suspicions of me. “The prophecy states that a new ruler of Scotland will spring from Lovat’s lineage. This is to come to pass following the eclipse of ‘the kings of the white rose’ – a clear reference to the Papist Stuarts, of course.[…] There are somewhat more cryptic references included in the prophecy, of course; the time in which this ruler will appear, and whether it is to be a king or a queen – there is some difficulty in interpretation, owing to mishandling of the original…”

He went on, but I wasn’t listening. If I had had any doubts about where Geilie had gone, it was fast disappearing. Obsessed with the rulers of Scotland, she had spent the better part of ten years in working for the restoration of a Stuart Throne. That attempt had failed most definitively at Culloden, and she had then expressed nothing but contempt for all extant Stuarts. And little wonder, if she thought she knew what was coming next.

But where would she go? Back to Scotland, perhaps, to involve herself with Lovat’s heir? No, she was thinking of making the leap through time again; that much was clear from her conversation with me. She was preparing herself, gathering her resources – retrieving the treasure from the silkies’ isle – and completing her researches.

I stared at the paper in a kind of fascinated horror. The genealogy, of course, was only recorded to the present. Did Geilie know who Lovat’s descendants gout be, in the future?

In Voyager, the prophecy plays into Geillis’ motivation culminating in the climax in the cave and then it seems to fade from the stories – a convenient plot device that appears to have served its purpose.

Until it comes back again in An Echo in the Bone and Written in My Own Heart’s Blood. DuringEcho, there are several people who seem to be looking for Fergus but the motivations behind it and how important his bearing the name of Fraser is are unclear – and largely still only partially resolved (I’ve only just started my first re-read through the books and haven’t gotten that far, but from what I do recall, there were times it seemed two separate people/groups might be looking for Fergus and for different reasons).

The reference in Written in My Own Heart’s Blood that comes from Frank is way more direct. Brianna finds a letter from Frank that was addressed to her and in it he admits to having believed more about Claire’s tale than he admitted and having searched for Jamie Fraser as well and in the course of the letter, the prophecy comes up.

I think you won’t have heard of the Brahan Seer.  […] Amongst his lesser-known prophecies, though, was one called the Fraser Prophecy. There isn’t a great deal known about this, and what there is is rambling and vague, as prophecies usually are, the Old Testament notwithstanding. The only relevant bit, I think, is this: “The last of Lovat’s line will rule Scotland.”[…]

The Frasers of Lovat have a fairly straightforward line of descent, until we come to Old Simon – well, they’re all called Simon – the one they call the Old Fox, who was executed for treason after the Jacobite Rebellion[…] his heir was Young Simon, known as the Young Fox. Young Simon survived the Rising[…] and while he married, he did so at a very advanced age and had no children. His younger brother, Archibald, inherited, but then died childless, as well. 

So Archibald was the “last of Lovat’s line”[…] but clearly he wasn’t the Scottish ruler foreseen.[…] Whoever made [the genealogy] has listed two illegitimate sons, as well as Young Simon and his brother. Alexander and Brian, born to different mothers. Alexander entered the priesthood and became the abbot of a monastery in France. No known children. But Brian – […] The current line of Fraser of Lovat is descended from a collateral branch; presumably the Fraser Prophecy isn’t referring to one of them – though there are plenty of heirs in that line.[…]

The essence of what I’m saying is this: if you can indeed go back in time (and possibly return), you are a person of very great interest to a number of people, for assorted reasons. Should anyone in the more shadowed realm of government be halfway convinced that you are what you may be, you would be watched. Possibly approached.[…] That’s a very remote contingency, but it is a real one; I must mention it. 

There are private parties who would also have a deep interest in you for this reason – and evidently there is someone who has spotted you and is watching. The chart showing your line of descent, with dates, indicates that much. It also suggests that this person’s or persons’ interest may be a concern with the Fraser Prophecy. What could be more intriguing to that sort of person than the prospect of someone who is “the last of Lovat’s line” and is also a time traveler? These sorts of people – I know them well – invariable believe in mystic powers of all sorts – nothing would draw them more powerfully than the conviction that you hold such power.

Such people are usually harmless. But they can be very dangerous indeed. 

If I find whoever drew this chart, I will question them and do my best to neutralize any possible threat to you. But as I say – I know the look of a conspiracy. Nutters of this sort thrive in company. I might miss one. 

It’s a rather long chunk and I haven’t posted all of it – including the bits where Frank addresses his having tracked Jamie down through his research – but those are the parts most relevant to the Fraser Prophecy as it stands and the reason it is relevant to the story at that point in the series. The prophecy indicates that someone – possibly descended from Jamie or Jenny – could come to rule Scotland and there are people who might be trying to find them to either ensure that happens, or prevent it. It’s been hovering at the edges of the series from time to time but the events surrounding Roger, Brianna, Jemmy, and Mandy at the end of An Echo in the Bone and throughout Written in My Own Heart’s Blood certainly look like the prophecy storyline could be coming more and more to the forefront of things (and we might be getting some more significant answers in Book 9).

It came up during the Frank Discussion, because Frank knew about the prophecy and the threat it posed to Brianna – and he sat on the information.

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“Death of the Author” (a theory proposed by Roland Barthes) means you can have it your way.

In literary academia, there is a popular theory proposing that once an author, artist, or any creator of any form of art or music, creates a work and it is read, the “death of the author” occurs simultaneously with the “birth of the reader.” Simplified it means that once a reader reads a story, the reader is free to apply his/her own interpretations and meanings even if they are incongruent with those of the author. So don’t worry if you don’t love Frank or Laoghaire, or if you have a theory about certain plots, events, or characters in the story line. As long as your thoughts or theories are based on logic and sound reasoning, your own interpretation of meaning is the one that matters.

Check the links below for a better understanding of the “Dead Author” theory.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2A9ahG1iHQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkQsRVrWM6c

 

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Jamie’s Ghost

Diana Gabaldon has said two interesting things about the iconic “Jamie’s ghost” scene right at the beginning of Book 1 (and 01×01 in the TV show):

1. Jamie is ~25 years old at that moment

2. The scene will be explained in the last scene of the last book

Jamie was about that age when he fought at Culloden. Readers know how that was one of the times he nearly died.

So I think that as he’s delirious after the battle, he somehow sees Claire – who he had sent back through the stones on the morning of Culloden – in her own time.

But he doesn’t remember any of this until the very final moments of his life – and we know how memories of Culloden are slowly coming back to him in Book 7 and Book 8.

But this memory brings him peace, because at the very moment he’s leaving earth – and, presumably, Claire – he’s remembering the moment right before she came to him.

Totally speculation on my part…but I think it could be plausible…

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Wizard of…Outlander?

So I may be a bit late to the party on this one, but there are 2 *very interesting* parallels between Outlander and the Wizard of Oz (aside from the really obvious one in “The Gathering” (01×04)):

1. All the 1940s scenes are washed out, with muted colors. The moment Claire wakes up in 1743, we see lush greens and blues and real COLOR for the first time

2. Geillis wears red shoes. We see them close up twice – in “The Way Out” (01×03) and “The Devil’s Mark” (01×11)

So…no idea if this was intentional…but if it was: give credit where it’s due. Well played, Ron Moore.

 

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Among the theories postulated about time travel, a tumblr friend proposes a theory she terms “The Endless Loop.”  It is both fascinating and mind boggling.  http://gotham-ruaidh.tumblr.com/post/121471504266/the-endless-loop.  Below is her tumblr post.

The Endless Loop

Here’s something I’ve had in the back of my mind for almost as long as I’ve been an Outlander fan.

Jamie and Claire have always and will always find each other. Literally.

Claire is born in 1918 and falls through time in 1945. She arrives in 1743, spends 3 years there, goes back to the 20th century, stays there until 1968, goes back to 1766. Presumably lives the rest of her days with Jamie until she dies (Diana Gabaldon has repeatedly said that she expects the series to end circa 1800, in Scotland, but then again she said that Book 5 would be called “King Farewell” and that there would only be one more book after that…but I digress…)

Anyway, the key point is that even if Jamie and Claire pass away circa 1800, Claire will be born again in 1918. She’ll fall through time again in 1945. She’ll meet Jamie again in 1743. Etc.

So they’re in an endless loop of finding each other, losing each other, and then finding each other again.

Here’s food for thought: If Jamie and Claire are in this loop – and have been in it countless times – what iteration are we reading about in the Books? Is this their 10th go-round? 100th?

But it doesn’t matter – because they always, always find each other.

_________________

Thoughts?

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Episode 110 is another great one in Season 1, and we’re glad to share some of our favorite scenes.

The Smackdown.

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Could you swear you didn’t cheer aloud when Claire slapped Leghair?  You know she had it coming.

The Edict

ol-s1-10-colum-angry1 ol-s1-10-colum-angry2

This is great because it shows that Colum, though feeble and smaller in stature commands the room.   He is The MacKenzie.  There is no doubt about that.

Goodbye Kiss

ol-s1-10-jamie-claire-kiss1 ol-s1-10-jamie-claire-kiss2

*sigh*  Here is the point in which Claire chooses.  “Come back to me, James Fraser.”  She has done all she can to take care of him, she has made sure he has more than what he needs, but she needs him to come back.  She loves him, and Jamie knows it.  That is why he is on the verge of tears at this parting.  He will miss her, yes, but he is touched that she will miss him as well.

And the kiss.

Mrs. Fitz

ol-mrs-fitz7 ol-mrs-fitz8 ol-mrs-fitz9a ol-mrs-fitz9

We love Mrs. Fitz.  If her reaction is any indication of the majority at Castle Leoch, Colum may have underestimated the acceptance of Jamie as Laird and Claire as his Lady.  Regardless, Mrs. Fitz has always supported Claire and has a genuine affection for both of them.  We hope she and her family survive the aftermath of Culloden.

The Changeling

ol-s1-10-jamie-claire-at-fairy-mound1 ol-s1-10-jamie-claire-on-fairy-hill2

This isn’t necessarily a favorite scene, but it is one that makes us wonder.  Claire is catapulted back through time 200 years, yet she completely dismisses any notion of fairies, changelings, or anything else from the mythological or supernatural realms.  After having an experience that defies explanation, one would think she would be a little more open minded.

 

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Ok everyone!  Who is ready to get elbow deep into Book 3 of the Outlander Series – Voyager by Diana Gabladon.  If you do not have a copy you  can get one here as a hardcopy, digital, or audiobook version.

I am testing out how I want to do this, so there may be a change in formatting here and there.  I will always try to put the synopsis and content discussion under a cut.  That should keep spoilers down to a minimum.

Today we will be talking about the Prologue and  Chapter 1

Warning…..there be spoilers ahead!

Continue reading Voyager Readalong Prologue – Chapter 1

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Lionsgate and Starz to Spend $1.8 Billion on New Films, TV Shows

Lionsgate is banking on the old adage that content is king. As part of that strategy, the media company will spend $1.8 billion annually on new films and television shows, Lionsgate Chairman Jon Feltheimer said during a shareholders meeting in Toronto on Tuesday.

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Lionsgate is banking on the old adage that content is king.

As part of that strategy, the media company will spend $1.8 billion annually on new films and television shows, Lionsgate Chairman Jon Feltheimer said during a shareholders meeting in Toronto on Tuesday. That figure represents the programming budget of not just the studio, but alsoStarz, the cable player that Lionsgate has a deal to buy for $4.4 billion.

That will work out to roughly $1.5 billion spent by Lionsgate for film and TV content combined, and approximately $300 million shelled out by Starz for TV programming.

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In some brisk remarks to investors, Feltheimer said that, backing this programming will allow Lionsgate to “…deepen our relationships with current distribution partners as well as to forge alliances with new digital platforms.”

Analysts have questioned the sales price for Starz, arguing that it leaves the company heavily leveraged. But Feltheimer also argued that bringing the players together would lead to cost savings, in the form of more than $200 million in combined operating cost synergies and cash tax savings. That deal is expected to close by the end of 2016.

A union with Starz also gives the studio greater negotiating heft in a field that is dominated by sprawling media conglomerates such as Disney and Comcast — companies that command theme parks, cable channels, and massive merchandising operations. That allows them to demand better pricing for the shows they license to cable providers and other distributors.

A marriage between Lionsgate, the studio behind “The Hunger Games,” and Starz, the maker of “Outlander” and “Power,” will, in Feltheimer’s words, give the two entities “more leverage [and] better relationship for us with all of our buyers.”

The company’s theatrical business has struggled in recent months due to the failure of “Gods of Egypt,” a pricey fantasy film, and the end of the “Hunger Games” franchise.
But Feltheimer argued that Lionsgate’s mojo is back. Its film business is on a roll, he claimed, while hailing the upcoming release of the acclaimed musical “La La Land” and the World War II drama “Hacksaw Ridge.” He also cited the success of television programs such as Hulu’s “Casual” and HBO’s “American Lion.”

The Lionsgate chief stressed the company’s willingness to take advantage of digital platforms as a means of bringing its programs to the masses, noting recent pacts with the likes of YouTube Red and Verizon’s Go90, as evidence of its flexibility. Once the merger closes, the companies will also be involved on five over-the-top services and a Starz app.

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Lionsgate to Acquire Starz for $4.4 Billion

“These new platforms are bringing us closer to the consumer and capitalizing on our natural advantages as a young, digitally-fluent next generation studio,” said Feltheimer.

The gathering took place at the Shangri-La Hotel, with a crowd that was dominated by board members, executives, and only a handful of investors. As part of the meeting, shareholders approved the nominations of Mike Fries, the CEO of Liberty Global, and David Zaslav, the CEO of Discovery, to the board of Lionsgate. The two executives helped orchestrate the Starz merger through the companies’ stakes in Lionsgate. Sir Lucian Grainge, the CEO Of Universal Music Group, was also approved as Lionsgate’s newest director.

John Malone, Liberty Media and Liberty Global’s chairman and a Lionsgate board member, was not on hand.

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Caitriona Balfe’s best moments in Outlander as she marks three years playing Claire Fraser

www.dailyrecord.co.uk

AS Caitriona Balfe marks three years in the role that has catapulted her to stardom here we mark her five best moments in Outlander

 

Caitriona Balfe as Claire Fraser

THIS week marks the third anniversary of Caitriona Balfe joining the cast of Outlander to star as time-traveling combat nurse Claire Beauchamp Randall.

From the first episode, it was clear Balfe was the perfect choice to play the hard-headed, soft-hearted character, Claire.

To celebrate, here’s a look back at some of Balfe’s most memorable moments from the last three years.

The time she fixed Jamie’s dislocated shoulder

This scene cut straight to the heart of Claire’s character. She had been tossed through time, attacked by Black Jack Randall, hauled to a strange cabin by a violent (albeit loveable) ruffian, and still had the presence of mind to properly set Jamie’s shoulder. Because at the heart of it, Claire is a healer first.

The wedding

It was a beautiful episode in its entirety. The dress, of course, was stunning, and the private moments between Claire and Jamie were by turns tender and humorous. But perhaps the most poignant scene was the moment she stood staring at her two wedding bands, a bittersweet reminder of all she had lost and all she had gained.

Any time Claire sassed Dougal

Whether she was knocking him over the head with a handy object or giving him a sound tongue lashing, she stood her ground and refused to back down.

Faith

In this episode, fans had the opportunity to witness Claire without her hard veneer as she crumbled at the heartbreaking loss of her baby girl. Vulnerable and without such hard edges, she seemed a much more relatable person.

When Claire says goodbye to Jamie

Her agony at their parting – for what she believes is the final time – is clear, as is the fact that she knows she has no choice but to go back through the stones to an uncertain future. A heartrending moment indeed, and Balfe brought it to life on screen in a way that left her fans’ hearts hurting, as well.

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