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There isn’t a single aspect of this episode that is not wonderful.  In fact, for many fans it is the most highly anticipated and memorable event in the Outlander universe.

Conditions

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This is a favorite scene because we see how serious Jamie is about the marriage contract.  Before he agrees, he consults Murtagh, saying he intends to be wed but once and asking him what he thinks about Claire and whether his mother would approve.  Murtagh assures Jamie that she “will do,” and that her smile is as sweet as Jamie’s mother’s smile.  (”Still waters run deep, ye ken?)

After having received Murtagh’s approval, he agrees to marry Claire in order to keep her out of the clutches of Black Jack Randall.  However, the fact that he takes it so seriously and gives Dougal conditions for the marriage tells us that there is more to his decision.  Jamie’s conditions will insure that the ceremony will be as special as possible for both of them under the current circumstances.  He demands the ceremony be held in a church before a priest and that Claire have a ring and a proper wedding dress.  Jamie is always thinking about Claire.  This is why he is the King of Men.  Every woman needs a Jamie.

A Blood Oath is Made

OL-S1.7-the-wedding-pt.-2-5 OL-S1.7-the-wedding-pt.-2-6 OL-S1.7-the-wedding-pt.-2-7 OL-S1.7-the-wedding-pt.-2-8 OL-S1.7-the-wedding-pt.-2-9 OL-S1.7-the-wedding-pt.-2-10 Gaelis Wedding vow

The visuals in this episode are most pleasing (ahem..), but the the significance of the Gaelic Wedding Vow should not be diminished. If Claire had been aware of its significance, she may have refused to do it at the time because she saw the marriage as a temporary resolution of her problem and had every intention of getting back to the stones.

The magic in this story (especially the books) is sometimes subtle, but it is potent, and the Gaelic Wedding Vow that Claire and Jamie take is essentially a blood oath.  Blood is a powerful symbolism, and sometimes even has mystical powers.  The blood oath makes use of this to make a commitment that can’t be broken.

Blood spilling is a potent force in the working of magic, and in some mythologies certain types of blood are deemed more powerful than others.  Some consider the blood of royalty, the blood of a special line (Fraser, the Fraser Prophesy), the caster’s own blood (Jamie and Claire), and virgin’s blood (Jamie) to be most powerful.

In many ways their wedding ceremony represents the traditions of their time, but their blood vow may be described as something between a binding handfasting and an initiation.  It is a spiritual blending, a binding of their souls, not just to God but to one another, and not just for this lifetime but forevermore. Not until death-do-us-part but for all lifetimes to come.  Jamie knew what he was doing and knew it’s significance, but Claire did not.  Claire viewed the wedding as a temporary solution until she could return to her time, but Jamie took the ceremony and it accompanying oath very seriously. As he tells Murtagh, he intends to marry only once, and he wanted to do it right.  He insists that they wed in a church, before a priest, with a ring for Claire and a proper dress.  He wanted to make it special for her as well.  Claire’s heart may not have been in it initially, but, as we know, looking back she wouldn’t have changed a thing.  That, my friends, is a commitment.

I Said I Was a Virgin, Not a Monk

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Nothing else need be said about this scene other than it is perhaps one of the most beloved and anticipated lines from the Outlander novel.

“I did like it, Jamie.”

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After the first round of obligatory sex to consummate their marriage, Jamie asks Claire if she liked “it.”  The highlanders had given him advice, and Murtagh had said that women don’t usually enjoy “it.” Poor Jamie is crushed when Claire fails to respond immediately and he assumes she had not liked “it,” as Murtagh had warned.

In truth, Claire does not respond immediately because of her own internal conflict.  She is ashamed that she had indeed enjoyed their sexual act and feels like a “bigamist” and an “adulterer.”  Upon realizing his disappointment she admits that she had enjoyed the sex, which immediately improves Jamie’s outlook.  It is written all over his face.

Don’t worry, Jamie.  You and Claire will enjoy a fabulous, “not usual” sex life together.

Duty, Pleasure, Love

Jamie and Claire’s lives will never be the same now.  At the beginning of the episode they have already formed an attraction and at least a friendship.  Jamie’s feelings are stronger than Claire’s, but they begin their marriage as equals.

With an act of sexual duty they establish consummation and fulfill a contract.  As noted before, Jamie still hoped Claire would find it pleasing, and was gratified (and a little smug) to learn that she did.

Their next sexual act is for pure pleasure.  They take their time, engage in verbal foreplay, and are playful in bed.

Finally, they make love.  He shows her how much he values her by giving her the last remaining memory of his mother.  He has brought her into his family by this gift and she recognizes the value of that.

I think it is important to realize that in each of these encounters, Claire initiated the sexual act.

“Perhaps we should go to bed”

“Take off your clothes.  I want to look at you”  (thank you Claire!)

And finally by reaching out to him and making love with him, maintaining eye contact the entire time.

Jamie never once forced the issue with her.  She had been forced into too many things already.  In this instance, the choice was always hers.  The agency was always hers.  The power was always hers.

He is “under [her] power and happy to be there.”  It is a beautiful thing.

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Episode 106, “The Garrison Commander,” is not one for the feint of heart.  Claire’s meeting with Black Jack Randall is expanded from the book version to take up most of the episode.  Ron D. Moore’s expanded adaptation was intended to help shed light on the diabolical behavior and nature of the infamous Captain of Dragoons.  The flashbacks to Jamie’s flogging as Black Jack Randal recounts the events to Claire are disturbing and difficult to watch.  Two of our favorite scenes occur at the end of the episode and offer some much needed levity from the brutality of most of the subsequent scenes.  Therefore, rather than focusing on the darkness in which BJR tells Claire he belongs, we will focus on a scene that illustrates Jamie’s strength and defiance of his tormentor.

“The boy would not beg.”

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UGH!  This scene was both the best and the worst for me.  It was awful to watch, yet so masterfully played.  From an acting standpoint it is exceptional.  We have not just the voice over from Tobias (as BJR) in that flat affect, but Sam really sells so convincingly the pain of the flogging and Jamie’s stubborn determination not to acknowledge it.

From a narrative POV, THIS small but effective scene is the crux of the relationship between Black Jack Randall James Fraser.  This moment is what precipitated BJR’s fascination/obsession.  Jamie’s strength of will became Jack’s white whale.  And we know how THAT turns out.  Grrr.

This scene, this horrible, awful, beautiful scene so perfectly showcases and explains everything that comes after it.  Everything.  All of Black Jack’s subsequent actions (and words) to both Jamie and Claire are predicated by what he says here.  We see that he likes to hurt.  He likes to break.  He attempts it with Jamie in the actual flogging.  He attempts (and perhaps succeeds) in the recounting of it to Claire.  I don’t believe that it was a moment of self-reflection for him.  It was a moment of pride.  He was gloating to Claire, and thereby breaking her trust that somewhere inside him was a decent human being.  He set her up perfectly for the literal/metaphorical gut punch that comes next.  BJR is literally the worst.

Even though this passage is less than a page in the book, I love that they devoted an entire episode to it in the series.  It was important not just to learn the lengths that BJR will go to, but we learned a lot about Jamie and Claire as well.  We actually learned a great deal about Jamie, more so than we have probably learned up to this point.  Yes, we were told of the flogging, but Jamie brushes it off.  He does not want people (Claire, Alec) to be uncomfortable or pity him for it.  But we never see the strength of character or stoic nature that Jamie has until we see the moment.  We see EXACTLY what Jamie is willing to put himself through for the people he loves.  We see the pride that Jamie has.  This pride is not a character flaw.  It is a pride of WHO he is… not just as a man, but as a Scot.  He is a symbol of the Scottish people.  They are beaten, shackled, and abused, but they are not broken.  They will not beg.    -S

“Well, I must admit, the idea of grinding your corn does tickle me.”

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I love Graham McTavish, but his character, Dougal, is not a favorite of mine.  That said, in Episode 106, Dougal has a line of dialogue that has become iconic in the Outlander fandom.  “Well, I must admit, the idea of grinding your corn does tickle me…”   Truthfully, with the possible exceptions of Father Bain and the Duke of Sandringham, who among the male characters wouldn’t like to grind Claire’s corn?

People who had not read the Outlander books before seeing this episode must have been anxious to learn exactly who Dougal had nominated for the position of Claire’s husband.  They must have breathed a sigh of relief to learn that it was not Angus, Rupert, or even Murtagh, but Jamie.  Don’t worry, Claire.  Everything is going to work out just fine.

“I reckon one of us should ken what they’re doing.”

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Claire, you are a lucky woman.  Dougal nominated Jamie for the job.  (Though I must add that Jamie is also lucky because God is giving him a “rare woman.”)  This is one of my all time favorite scenes. Claire isn’t pleased about the forced marriage, but with the aid of a bottle of whisky she reconciles herself to it.  Jamie isn’t nearly as bothered about it.  Their mutual attraction is strong, but he is willing to do anything to protect Claire from Black Jack Randall.  The look on Claire’s face when Jamie informs her that he is a virgin is simply priceless.  The thought of de-flowering the young highlander clearly makes her anxious, but as we will see in the next episode, “The Wedding,” Jamie is a quick learner.  In fact, in the book, Claire reflects that “Virgins are highly underrated.”   -D

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Episode 104, “Rent”

Claire has already begun to establish a friendship and mutual attraction with Jamie, but after a rocky start, in “Rent” she finally solidifies her relationship with the Highlanders.

OL-S1.5-Jamie-and-Claire2-8-13OL-S1.5-Jamie-and-Claire-8-13  Once on their journey to collect rents, it isn’t long before Claire begins to feel isolated from the Highlanders.  She is concerned that their use of Gaelic represents an effort to exclude her, and she reminds herself that being on the road would be her opportunity to escape.  Jamie notices her unease and comes to her.  She asks him if the Highlanders hate her.  Jamie reassures her but admits that they don’t trust her.  Then she asks him if he thinks she is a spy for the British.  He tells her,  “No, but I do think there are things ye’re not telling us, and I know you tried to run during the Gathering.  It’s on your mind still, plain and clear.”

What is interesting about Jamie’s observation in that in the books, Claire is frequently puzzled by Jamie’s seeming ability to read her mind.

OL-S1.5-Claire-and-Angus-8-13 OL-S1.5-Jamie-ripped-shirt-8-13  Once again, Claire’s righteous indignation causes conflict, and Jamie comes to her rescue when Angus does not take kindly to being called a thief.  Claire believes Dougal is not only collecting rent from clan members, but is using Jamie’s scars to garner sympathy from them in order to line his own pockets.

OL-S1.5-Claire-and-Ned-8-13  Claire’s healing skills had begun to give her some credibility and help build a measure of trust with Dougal and Colum.  However, when she confronts Ned about her suspicions, that trust quickly dissolves.  It isn’t until another collection night that Claire realizes Dougal is raises the extra money to finance a Jacobite rebellion.

OL-S1.5-Jamie-and-Claire3-8-13  This is my single most favorite scene from the episode.  The collection party stops at an inn for the night.  While the men drink downstairs in the tap room, Claire retires to her room upstairs.  A noise outside her door leads her to investigate the source of the disturbance.  She finds Jamie just outside the door after she steps on him.  For fear that the drunken men might wonder upstairs, he again intends to protect her by sleeping at her door.  She offers to let him come inside, but he fears it “would ruin [her] reputation.”  Amused, Claire instead offers him her blanket, “If it isn’t too scandalous,” and he bashfully accepts.  The sexual tension in this scene can be cut with Jamie’s dirk.  (Yes, pun intended.)

OL-S1.5-fight-8-13  The next morning during breakfast when Claire tries to convince Ned that history will never again record the name of a Stuart king, a group of rowdy locals are heard referring to Claire as a “Hoor.”  Ironically, Angus, who had previously drawn his knife on her, is the first to throw a punch in defense of her honor.  After the fight, Murtagh explains to Claire that as she is a guest of the Mackenzie, “We can insult ye, but God help any other man that does.”  Even Dougal joins in the fight.  This represents a turning point in Claire’s relationship with the Mackenzies.  A bond is strengthened and she is defended as one of their own.

OL-S1.5-Claire-tells-joke-8-13  Rupert regales the group with a story about his experience with two women in bed, where they become jealous and begin arguing over who he will “swipe” first.  “Can you believe it?” he jokes.  Claire replies, “I believe your left hand gets jealous of your right.  That’s about all I believe.”  After a brief silent pause, Rupert breaks into a hardy laugh, the Highlanders following suit.  “Ah, you’re a witty one,” Jamie says.  Amazed at what he has heard from Claire, Rupert says, “I’ve never heard the woman make a joke!”  Claire responds, “There’s a first time for everything.” Clearly the entire groups appreciates the moment, and the bond with the Highlanders is now solidified.

Now Claire needs only to convince Dougal that she is not a spy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Scottish clans looking to appoint new chiefs

MANY of Scotland’s ancient clans are without a chief. Perhaps you have the lineage to take up one of these ceremonial roles, writes Chris McCall THE days of clan chiefs wielding claymores and dispensing justice are long gone. Modern chieftains are purely ceremonial figures, more likely to be employed as landscape gardeners than live in Highland castles.

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Picture: Hamish Campbell/TSPL CHRIS MCCALL 16:04Thursday 04 August 2016 2

MANY of Scotland’s ancient clans are without a chief. Perhaps you have the lineage to take up one of these ceremonial roles, writes Chris McCall THE days of clan chiefs wielding claymores and dispensing justice are long gone. Modern chieftains are purely ceremonial figures, more likely to be employed as landscape gardeners than live in Highland castles. A series of laws passed in the aftermath of the final Jacobite rebellion in 1746 effectively stripped chiefs of any authority. While some remain substantial landowners and local worthies, by the 20th century chieftains were largely forgotten figures. Many clans became armigerous – having no recognised chief – as family lines died out. But an increasing interest in family history, especially among those whose ancestors had emigrated from Scotland, prompted a revival in clan societies from the mid-20th century onwards.

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Ranald Alasdair MacDonald spent 30 years fighting to be recognised as the 32nd chief of the MacDonalds of Keppoch, a battle he finally won in 2006. Scotland’s newest clan chief, Iain Alexander Gunn, was appointed in April this year. He became the first recognised head of Clan Gunn since 1785.

There are currently more than 150 armigerous clans. Some have recognised ‘commanders’, a rank below chief which must be renewed every 10 years. All chiefs and commanders must be recognised by the Lyon Court – an ancient legal office in charge of all heraldic symbols and state ceremonies in Scotland.

MacQuarrie

This ancient family once owned the islands of Ulva, Staffa and Gometra in the Inner Hebrides, as well as large parts of Mull. Among its most famous members was Major-General Lachlan Macquarie, often referred to as ‘The Father of Australia’. He served as the last autocratic governor of New South Wales until 1821 and oversaw the settlement’s transformation from a penal colony to a free settlement. Although there is an active Clan MacQuarrie society, the last recognised chief died in 1818 and no one has claimed the title since.

Maxwell 

One of Scotland’s oldest clans appoint new chief Maxwell The impressive Caerlaverock Castle on the south coast of Scotland was built by the Maxwells, a powerful lowland clan, in the 13th century. Robert Maxwell, 9th Lord Maxwell, was created Earl of Nithsdale in 1620, reflecting the family’s prestige. The last clan chief, the fifth Earl of Nithsdale, was a fervent Jacobite supporter and was captured following the battle of Preston in 1715. He was sentenced to death and imprisoned in the Tower of London, but somehow managed to escape – while dressed as a maid – with the help of his wife. The earl fled to Rome and died without issue.

MacFarlane

Descendents of the ancient earls of Lennox, the MacFarlanes principally lived on the north-western shore of Loch Lomond. They played a key role in the battle of Pinkie Cleugh in 1547, and later supported the forces which defeated Mary, Queen of Scots, at the battle of Langside in 1567. Such was their reputation for cattle rustling and fighting, the clan was denounced by the Scottish Parliament in 1594 and its clansmen were often persecuted. Several hundred later immigrated to Ireland as a result. The 20th and final chief, William Macfarlane, died in 1866.

Pringle

A common name in the Scottish Borders to this day, the Pringles have had no clan chief since John Hoppringle died in 1737. An active Clan Pringe society encourages members of the family to trace their ancestry as part of a concerted effort to appoint a new chief.

Buchanan

This family, whose principal seat was in Stirlingshire, proves the complex nature of legally identifying a new chief for the first time in more than 350 years. John Buchanan of Buchanan, the last chief, died around 1680. The clan was once a powerful force in central Scotland. Buchanans fought at Flodden in 1513 and were firm supporters of the Covenanters in the mid-1600s. The Buchanan Society, which traces its origins to a charity founded in Glasgow in 1725, remains active and claims to be the oldest clan-related society in the world.

(2)   cambayne 1:05 PM on 09/08/2016 In ancient times I believe that the position of Clan chief was an elected position. The gradual introduction of the feudal system perhaps at that time aided by the greed of incumbent toiseachs led to these positions becoming hereditary. As the feudal system is now generally in desuetude we can dispose of the Lord Lyon and return to the historic procedure. (0)

(1)   J Fife 7:24 AM on 06/08/2016 Clan MacDuff (Dhuibh) — the first clan so recognized by Scottish Parliament. To us belongs the right to crown the King on the Stone of Scone; and that the Earl of Fife should lead the vanguard when the King gives battle. There must be a Chief reinstated.

Read more at: http://www.scotsman.com/heritage/people-places/the-scottish-clans-looking-to-appoint-new-chiefs-1-4194405

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http://www.historicalfirearms.info/post/97915547775/the-union-between-scotland-england-the

Union between Scotland and England

The Union Between Scotland & England

The relationship between England and Scotland has been a long and tempestuous one.  Even if we simply examine the last 300 years the relationship between the two has been uneasy.  The first joining of nations came in 1603, with the union of the two crowns when James VI of Scotland succeeded the heirless Elizabeth I to become James I of England.  Despite numerous calls for a union of the two countries’ parliaments over the next century, and the brief union of the two nations imposed by Oliver Cromwell’s Commonwealth during the 1650s, it would not be until 1707 that the political union would take place following the economic impact of Scotland’s failed Darien Expedition.

Even once united politically the Union remained tenuous as political crisis gripped Britain during the late 17th century.  In 1715 and again in 1745 major rebellions took place in aid of the Jacobite cause, these however were brutally suppressed by Britain.  By the late 18th and early 19th Century the political landscape had settled with Scots becoming some of the period’s key figures including General James Abercrombie, Admiral Thomas Cochrane, Chancellor Henry Brougham and Keir Hardie among innumerable others from almost every field from the arts to law, from architecture to science.

Despite a number of moves during the mid 20th century by the British government to devolve power north it was not until 1999, that the first Scottish Parliament was formed.  2007 saw the Scottish Independence Party come to power for the first time and by 2011 the calls for a referendum on independence had gained momentum.  In 2012 it was agreed by both governments to hold a vote to allow the people of Scotland to decided their future.  The referendum saw the Scottish people vote in favour of remaining within the Union.  However, increased devolution was promised by the British Government and the next nine months will see negotiation over the details of increased home rule.  In turn the referendum has spurred calls for increased local powers and franchise for both England and Wales with calls for each to have their own individual parliaments deciding on regional matters while the Union Parliament decides on matters of national and international importance. With next year’s general election this is likely to become a key issue in deciding the political landscape.

Image:  Treaty of Union which agreed the terms of the Union between England and Scotland, it was made law when the Acts of Union were assented to by the English and Scottish parliaments in 1706 and 1707 respectively. (source)

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FYI, in Scotland, the words “bannocks” and “scones” are often used interchangeably.

Grandma Johnson’s Scones Recipe

Using simple ingredients and only 30 minutes, this easy raisin scone recipe is a perfect sweet snack for the whole family.

Grandma Johnson's Scones

Grandma Johnson’s Scones

  • Prep 15 m

  • Cook 15 m

  • Ready In 30 m

Recipe By:Rob
“A basic scone recipe that really does the trick. Tried and tested through 3 generations of kids. Simply the best anywhere!”

Ingredients

  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup raisins (optional)

Directions

  1. In a small bowl, blend the sour cream and baking soda, and set aside.
  2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Lightly grease a large baking sheet.
  3. In a large bowl, mix the flour, sugar, baking powder, cream of tartar, and salt. Cut in the butter. Stir the sour cream mixture and egg into the flour mixture until just moistened. Mix in the raisins.
  4. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and knead briefly. Roll or pat dough into a 3/4 inch thick round. Cut into 12 wedges, and place them 2 inches apart on the prepared baking sheet.
  5. Bake 12 to 15 minutes in the preheated oven, until golden brown on the bottom.

 

 

One reviewer posted a helpful hint for this recipe:

more like a muffin than a scone – cutting way back on the sugar, and eliminating the egg would make it more like a true scone. also, it makes me crazy when one of the “most useful” reviews tells readers to let the butter come to room temperature so that it can be creamed with the sugar. scones are meant to be flaky, which requires cutting cold butter into flour. creaming is a technique used in cakes and cookies…

Incorporate the tip or not, depending on your personal preference.

 

 

 

 

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http://www.thenational.scot/news/jacobites-to-rise-again-with-re-enactment-at-highlands-stronghold-fort-george.20938

OL season 2

BATTLE re-enactors will take up swords this weekend for a new event exploring the historic Jacobite Risings.

Highlands stronghold Fort George will host the two-day “Stuarts’ Struggle” event, with costumed actors recounting the 60 years of civil war and unrest.

Living history camps and guided tours will help teach visitors about the risings of 1689, 1715 and 1745 as Stuart supporters fought to restore the exiled King James VII and his descendants to the throne.

Fort George was built in response to the Jacobite threat, commissioned by the government following the disastrous Battle of Culloden to put a stop to any further show of arms.

The military base was strategically positioned and held more than 80 guns, with accommodation for a garrison of 2,000 redcoats.

Fran Caine of Historic Environment Scotland said: “The Jacobite Risings form an important period in Scottish history.

“Spanning around 60 years, these events shaped the Scotland, and in particular the Highlands, of today and their legacy is still visible in battlefields and defences – such as Fort George.

“The Stuarts’ Struggle event, which is new for this year, will offer an insight into the three main rebellions, as visitors discover the history behind this period of unrest and civil war in 18th-century Scotland.

“There will also be opportunities to discover what life could have been like for Jacobite soldiers during the Risings of 1689, 1715 and 1745 as well as learning about Fort George itself, which was built by the government in a strategic move to stop any further risings by the Jacobites.”

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This.  This is my favourite scene in The Gathering.  No question about it.

We see witty Jamie

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We see protective Jamie

 

 

 

 

We see Jamie who is willing to put himself on the line for Claire.

OL-S1.4-Jamie-Claire-in-stables3OL-S1.4-Jamie-Claire-in-stables5OL-S1.4-Jamie-Claire-in-stables6   He never tells her why he wasn’t at the Gathering.  He doesn’t need her to know that.  He isn’t doing it so she will love him.  He just wants her safe.

He also never makes her feel like he will tell Dougal that she tried to escape.  His concern isn’t that she wanted to leave, but that she wouldn’t be successful and things would only be worse for her.

***sigh***

Claire knows she can trust him.  She takes his hand and together they go back to the castle.  This is the first time they act as a team.  That is important, and it so often goes unnoticed.

 

What do you think?  Is this your favourite scene as well?  We love to hear your comments.

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Episode 103, “The Way Out,” gives us so many good Jamie and Claire moments.  Their attraction builds, though Claire would prefer to deny it, at least to herself.  Claire also builds her friendship with Geillis, but draws upon herself the wrath of Father Bain after healing Mrs. Fitz’s nephew.  Finally, at the end of the episode, Gwyllyn’s song gives Claire hope of returning to her home.

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This exchange between Jamie and Claire is so precious.  Jamie seems impressed that Claire isn’t fully intoxicated yet, and Claire seems proud of herself that he recognizes her ability to hold her (or Colum’s) rhenish.  This leads us to the next great scene.

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The sexual tension in this scene could be cut with a knife.  Out of feat that Claire will soon be too drunk to find her way safely back to the surgery, Jamie asks Claire to check his bandages.  When he confesses his true intent, Claire decides she may as well check him anyway.  The looks they exchange speak volumes about what they’re feeling.  Jamie looks pleased that Claire is taking such an interest. Had Jamie not been the gentleman he is, he probably could have had her right there in the surgery.

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I am no fan of Laoghaire, but this scene is important because it triggers some unexpected reactions in Claire.  Laoghaire lassos Jamie for a kiss, but Jamie especially enjoys it when he realizes Claire is watching.  Is he trying to make her jealous?

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After seeing Jamie and Laoghaire kissing, Claire teases Jamie in the dining hall.  Clearly it was a dangerous thing to do, and Murtagh chastises her for it.  Murtagh seems to share our sentiments regarding Laoghaire’s suitability as a mate for Jamie.

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Immediately after the dining hall scene, Claire goes outside to be alone and cries.  Claire’s voiceover tells us that she feels guilty for teasing Jamie and that she did it because she was jealous… not jealous of Laoghaire but of their “intimacy.”  Then she has thoughts of Frank.  However, I believe in this scene Claire is an unreliable narrator.  She will not admit to herself that there was indeed some jealousy of Jamie and Laoghaire.  She is fighting the attraction she has for Jamie.

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As Dougal promised, he takes Claire to visit Geillis so we can replenish her herb supply, but Jamie is sent to “fetch” her after Dougal is called by to Leoch.  This scene illustrates Jamie and Claire’s ability to communicate with each other non-verbally.  The expressions on their faces tell us everything.

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This is the first of many times we see Jamie and Claire working together as a team.  With a hefty price on his head, it is quite a risk for Jamie to be seen in public.  This also makes me suspicious about Jamie being sent there to “fetch” her in the first place.  Did Dougal intend to put Jamie at risk of being caught?

 

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I was supposed to do this today.  But headaches happen.   So, it will be coming soon.  I encourage everyone to read along with us and please add comments at the bottom of the posts.  I will keep spoilers below a cut or hidden so those of you unfamiliar with the story won’t have it ruined for you.

We will be discussing the Prologue, Chapters 1 and 2 in the coming post if you want to prepare yourselves for it.

I can’t wait to enjoy this story again and get new insight from our readers.

 

See you soon!

 

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